Tag Archives: pop

Album Review: Something To Tell You (2017) by HAIM

You can rely on the Haim sisters to drop the catchiest album of 2017 so far. Something To Tell You doesn’t stray too far from the Fleetwood Mac and Michael Jackson tinged style of HAIM’s last album – Days Are Gone – but that doesn’t stop it from being great. If the album doesn’t exactly push the band forward, it least shows them continuing to do what they do best.

HAIM are one of the best pop acts around at moment and you only have to give their 2013 debut to see why. Bursting with incredible singles, like ‘The Wire’, ‘Don’t Save Me’ and ‘Falling’ (one of the few songs that I find impossible not to groove to…), to me it was pure pop perfection. Catchy, accessible and a lot of fun. Sure, it didn’t do much that other bands hadn’t done before, but it just captured that 70s/80s pop sound so well. Something To Tell You in many ways feels like Days Are Gone 2.0; the band don’t really progress much from the sound of their debut and that’s both a good thing and a bad thing.

The reason why it’s a good thing is probably obvious – if you loved the band’s debut as much as I did then you’ll find a lot to love on this new release. Some of the songs on here, like singles ‘Want You Back’ and ‘A Little Of Your Love’ are pure fire and are pretty much guaranteed to be on repeat for the rest of the year. The album’s other main single ‘Right Now’ has received a bit of a polarising reaction – mainly because the studio version is quite a bit weaker than the live version the band released just before it – but it still might be my overall favourite track. I’m just a sucker for a slow build. There are plenty of great deep cuts as well, like ‘Ready For You’, which has a great groove to it (and a second half that reminds me of ‘Faith’ by George Michael), and the thumping title track.

It should also be obvious why the lack of progression is a bad thing… The issues I had with their debut feel amplified now that the band have repeated them again. One of my main problems are the lyrics which, while not awful, definitely feel a bit too broad and bland. It never feels like HAIM get nitty and gritty and personal with their lyrics, which is a problem. It makes the songs easy to relate to, sure, but I think it also creates a sense of distance between the band and the listener. It never feels like we really get to know any of the band members through these songs.

My other complaint about the album is one that I’ve seen crop up in a few places – particularly in reference to ‘Right Now’. The band released a pretty raw live version of the track before the studio one, and by comparing these two recordings of the song, Something To Tell You’s main problem is immediately obvious: there’s too much going in some of these tracks. While the songs themselves are incredibly solid, a lot of the tracks feel like they had a little too much time spent on them in the mixing room, with random bleeps and bits of vocal distortion hanging around in the background a lot. The album would’ve benefitted a lot from just being stripped back a little bit.

But despite this, Something To Tell You is still pretty fantastic. There are a lot of great songs here (many I didn’t even get around to mentioning like ‘Nothing’s Wrong’ and ‘You Never Knew’) and it’s a great listen from front to back. It’s the sort of album that you can’t resist dancing around your room to.

Best Tracks: ‘Want You Back’, ‘Little Of Your Love’, ‘Right Now’

Album Review: I See You (2017) by The xx

I’ll admit it: I’ve never been the biggest fan of The xx. While I thought their debut had a few great tracks (‘Intro’, ‘VCR’, ‘Crystallised’) a lot of it just kind of faded together. None of the songs were particularly bad, but some were definitely forgettable. I had a similar reaction to Coexist, which was stronger in many ways, but also weaker in some too… Like the first album though, it definitely had some really great tracks (mainly ‘Angels’).

So here we are… I See You. The album’s lead single ‘On Hold’ peaked my interest due to being, well, a lot livelier than what we’ve come to expect from The xx. The track didn’t really cover any new topics for the band – heartbreak once again – but it seemed like they were having a bit more fun than usual, trying to be adventurous. Though I think it’s almost entirely down to the production work of Jamie xx, the song is just a lot more memorable than most of the tracks off the band’s first two albums, with the instrumentation being less sparse and muted.

Luckily this sense of fun is present in a lot of the songs on I See You. Opener ‘Dangerous’ is perhaps the most upbeat song the band have ever churned out, being stuffed to the brim with catchy hooks. Like ‘On Hold’, the instrumentation is more adventurous than that found on the band’s past two albums – featuring horns (horns!) and siren sounds among many other things.

On most tracks, it is the instrumentation that really brings things to life. Croft and Sim’s vocals are as strong as ever, don’t get me wrong, but they don’t really do anything they didn’t do on The xx’s other albums. The backing vocals on ‘Lips’ elevate the track incredibly, and paired with the almost tropical instrumentation, it sounds unlike anything else The xx have put out. The stuttering instruments on ‘Say Something Loving’ add some strength to what is a pretty standard xx affair, and on ‘Test Me’, the track is almost entirely handed over to Jamie xx, with the vocals playing second fiddle to the many layers of synths.

I’m happy to say that the band even succeeds in making the album’s quieter, more standard xx songs stand out. ‘Performance’ and ‘Replica’ come to mind, them being great showcases for Croft and Sim’s vocals respectively. They also feature some of the strongest lyrics on the album (though I wouldn’t go as far to say that the writing is ‘great’.)

While I wouldn’t call any of the songs on I See You bad – each of them stands out in some way – there are a couple that get lost in the mix a bit. ‘Say Something Loving’ is a track that’s difficult to get excited about, and similarly ‘A Violent Noise’ and ‘Brave For You’ are a bit on the bland side. Like on the band’s last album, Coexist, the songs on this one suffer from having lyrics that are a bit on the broad side. The band avoids concrete descriptions, instead keeping the characters they play in each song vague and without any real sense of personality.

Ultimately, I think this is an album that’ll please existing xx fans and those who might not have enjoyed their previous albums very much. It’s a big leap forward for the band instrumentally, even if not much has changed when it comes to vocals and lyrics.

Essential Songs: ‘Dangerous’, ‘Lips’, ‘On Hold’.

Album Review: Stay Together (2016) by Kaiser Chiefs

Remember Employment? That was a pretty good album. Singles such as ‘I Predict a Riot’, ‘Everyday I Love You Less and Less’ and ‘Oh My God’ were (and still are) great, energetic, catchy songs. They were so infectious that it was hard to hate them even if you tried to.

The Kaiser Chiefs’ sixth album, We Stay Together, is almost certainly not going to be remembered in the same way. To get straight to the point, there’s absolutely nothing on the album that comes anywhere close to the quality of those three songs I mentioned. And it’s not because the band have done a genre u-turn – jumping abruptly from Indie Rock to straight up Pop – it’s just that the songs featured are clichéd and bland. Bland, bland, bland.

Let’s start with the album’s two singles, ‘Parachute’ and ‘Hole in My Soul’. I think I can safely say that these are the worst two songs on the album – at least lyrically. The chorus for ‘Parachute’ is perhaps the most horribly cringey and soppy thing I’ve ever heard: ‘If we’ve only got one parachute / You know, I’d give it to you’. The opening lyrics to ‘Hole in My Soul’ are similarly underwhelming and bland: ‘Strike up the band / Give yourselves a great big hand’. I know Kaiser Chiefs have never been lyrical geniuses, but there used to be a certain level of cleverness to their words. These lyrics are so clichéd it hurts. I know I ragged on Bastille for using clichés, but they still managed to pull together some good songs with some good instrumentations. Kaiser Chiefs don’t really do that.

It’s really impossible to view this album as anything else other than the band selling out. I know, I’m not overly fond of that term either, but it’s true. It doesn’t feel like they’re making the music they want to make – Ricky sounds incredibly bored on some of the tracks – but instead what they think is going to sell. As bad as they are, the two songs I mentioned do have the makings of mindless number one pop singles. I hated myself a little bit for getting ‘Parachute’ stuck in my head – but that’s the sort of song it is.

Another issue with this album – too many synths. There’s nothing wrong with synths, of course, but I dunno… They just aren’t used interestingly at all, and seem to smother all other instruments in the songs. It seems like every band evolves in a synth based direction these days, but some just manage it better than others. For example, with artists like Tame Impala and Wild Beasts it felt like a natural evolution of their sounds, building on their previous work… It doesn’t really feel like that here. By replacing all their instruments with synths, simplifying their lyrics and abruptly swapping genres all at the same time it feels like Kaiser Chiefs have lost everything that once made them a band worth listening to.

I suppose this is the part where I mention the album’s good (?) – or less bad – aspects. Like I said, it’s catchy in places, which can be seen as the album achieving its goal, and some of the songs aren’t completely awful. ‘Press Rewind’, ignoring its horrible opening (in which we’re repeatedly told that the band makes pop music now), is quite a bit of fun – and Ricky even seems to be enjoying himself. The opener, ‘We Stay Together’, also grew on me the more I listened to it. It hasn’t got much going for it other than a nice groove, but sometimes that’s all you need.

I could talk for a lot longer about the things I dislike about this album – like the incredible nothingness that is ‘Indoor Firework’ or the unbelievably cringey chorus on ‘Why Do You Do It To Me?’ – but there’s not really much point. This album isn’t worth your time. If you want to listen to Kaiser Chiefs, listen to their old stuff. If you want to listen to pop music there’s much better stuff out there. If you want to listen to soppy music there are many better songs available than the ones on this album. There’s no reason to listen to Stay Together, and I feel kinda bad for saying that because I’m sure some people worked hard on it. But really, don’t bother with this album.

Essential (or least bad) Songs: ‘We Stay Together’, ‘Press Rewind’, ‘Still Waiting’.

Album Review: Summer 08 (2016) by Metronomy

On Metronomy’s new album, the band (essentially just Joseph Mount) tries to recapture the style of their breakout album, Nights Out. Summer 08, the title, is a not-so-subtle reference to this, with 2008 being the year of that album’s release.

Nights Out is probably my favourite Metronomy album – I just love its strangeness – and while the two albums that followed it were great, they did smooth out the band’s eccentricities and weirdness a bit. Compare ‘Holiday’ from Nights Out to ‘The Look’ from The English Riviera and you’ll get what I mean.

Summer 08’s great opening track, ‘Back Together’, screams of this weirdness. The odd timings of the guitar and drums create an off-kilter, alien feel. Mount’s vocals are equally odd/brilliant, with him doing a high-pitch, cartoonish impression of the woman he’s trying to woo in the song. At the end the whole song crescendos into a dreamy outro with a great bit of bass.

‘Old Skool’ is another stand-out track, carrying a similar feel to ‘Back Together’. While that track focuses on 2008 Mount’s arrogance with regards to wooing the ladies (‘I’m sure I’ll find some time inside my diary’), this one is about his resentment towards those richer and more successful than him. The whole song comes across as a jealous, whiney impression of a successful person – intentionally, of course – ‘Make some money / Make more money / With your new friends, throw a party’. It’s got a really great groove to it as well.

After ‘Old Skool’, Metronomy drops the weirdness a little bit, but keeps its focus on nostalgia. ’16 Beat’, for example, shows Mount reminiscing about when he started to make music. There are a lot of solid songs in the album’s second half, with ‘Night Owl’ perhaps being my favourite. For the first minute of the song, the only instrument playing is a particularly melancholy-sounding synth, and it captures the album’s whole nostalgia theme perfectly. When the song kicks off properly, it just gets better. It almost acts as a flipside to ‘Old Skool’, swapping fun for sadness.

This is another one of those albums where I wouldn’t say there are any bad songs, just unmemorable ones. ‘My House’, ‘Love’s Not an Obstacle’ and ‘Summer Jam’ are the sort of songs I enjoy when listening to them, but as soon as they finish, I can’t remember anything about them. Summer 08’s great songs definitely outweigh these ones, though.

Joseph Mount reembracing the band’s early eccentricities has led to a fun album that captures all the different sides of nostalgia well. Definitely worth listening to, even if you aren’t familiar with Metronomy’s other stuff.

Essential Songs: ‘Back Together’, ‘Old Skool’, ‘Night Owl’.

Album Review: Blossoms (2016) by Blossoms

It’s pretty hard to dislike Blossoms’s debut album. Apart from a few duds, it’s pretty much wall-to-wall solid songs – almost all of them could be singles (and, from a brief glance at the band’s Wikipedia page, eight out of twelve of the album’s tracks are). They’re the sort of songs you can put on a party playlist with the safe knowledge that no one’s going to ask you to skip them.

But I suppose the main problem I have with Blossoms is that, I guess, it’s a little bit too safe. The band don’t really do anything you haven’t heard before with any of these tracks. A lot of their songs harken back to older bands – they say Oasis and The Stone Roses are their biggest influences – and so there’s not really much that feels challenging about this album. With this album they’ve simply tried to create a collection of catchy pop songs – and that’s something they’ve done really well.

The album kicks off with its best song, ‘Charlemagne’. The song doesn’t waste any time getting started, and just hits you immediately; it’s just the sort of song you want to dance to. Like most great songs, it’s got a great bass riff and the lyrics are pretty catchy: ‘My eyes tried, hide, cried, died’. It’s also pretty concise, finishing before it goes on for too long, making it easy to listen to several times – and a perfect fit for radio.

The three songs that follow are, if not quite as solid as the opener, still great songs. ‘At Most a Kiss’ continues the fast/short/catchy vibe of ‘Charlemagne’, while ‘Getaway’ and ‘Honey Sweet’ slow the pace down a little bit. The synth in the latter track is used to create a warm and gentle vibe, and it’s another clear stand-out on the album for me. One of my other favourite songs on Blossoms – one of the few that isn’t a single – is ‘Smashed Pianos’. The twanginess of the instruments in the second half of the song creates a great off-kilter/wonky vibe that generates the image of a smashed piano pretty well.

Many of the other songs on the album are strong – ‘Texia’, ‘Blown Rose’, ‘Deep Grass’ – but like I said, there are a few duds. ‘Cut Me and I’ll Bleed’ doesn’t really do much for me – it’s not awful, just kind of eh – and ‘Onto Her Bed’ and ‘My Favourite Room’ definitely feel like filler tracks. ‘Onto Her Bed’ in particular feels like it’s just trying to fill up the album’s runtime, kind of just meandering for a few minutes before abruptly fading out. Its lyrics are pretty cheesy as well: ‘My tears down the windy alley drain’.

Like I said, it’s pretty hard to dislike this album. Like many debut albums, it feels like the band is simply trying to collect all their best songs into one place – so it’ll be interesting to see where they go with their next one. Will they deliver another collection of singles or instead try to go for something more cohesive?

Essential Songs: ‘Charlemagne’, ‘Honey Sweet’, ‘Smashed Pianos’.