Review: The Pace of Passing (2017) by Toothless

The Pace of Passing is the first album from Toothless, a project led by Bombay Bicycle Club bassist Ed Nash. And to be honest, it’s a bit of a mixed bag. With so many of Bombay Bicycle Club’s songs having killer basslines – ‘Always Like This’ is the most obvious example – it was kind of easy to have high hopes for an album put together by the band’s bassist. And while Toothless’s debut isn’t awful, some elements of it definitely work significantly better than others.

Let’s start off with The Pace of Passing’s biggest weakness: Ed Nash’s vocals. He really can’t sing that well at all. His voice is about as bland as they get, having no force or emotion to it. There are plenty of frontmen out there who can’t sing very well, but manage to get away with it by putting enough passion into their voice or by having a unique quality. Nash’s vocals just sound kind of whinny at times, and it never really feels like he cares much about what he’s singing about. Whether it’s a romantic song like ‘Palm’s Backside’ or a more sinister one like ‘You Thought I Was Your Friend’, Nash’s vocals just aren’t good enough to get across the feelings you can tell he’s trying to.

And this kind of brings me to the album’s other big weakness, the lyrics. Most of the time they’re okay – never really passing beyond serviceable – but sometimes they make me want to full-on cringe. The chorus of ‘Palm’s Backside’ is particularly bad. And even when the lyrics aren’t awful, Nash’s delivery seems to drag them down. A good example of this is at the beginning of ‘Palm’s Backside’ (back to this song again); the way Nash draws out the opening lines just comes across as forced and slightly embarrassing.

But while these two elements of the album are almost consistently meh, the instrumentation on some of these tracks manages to save them a little bit. The opener ‘Charon’ has a beautiful mood to it, with the string instruments featured really helping it feel grand. The album closer ‘Terra’ similarly has a great mood, with the instrumentation reflecting the subject of the song well. Almost all of the songs on the album deal with mythology as a subject matter – as shown by song titles like ‘Sisyphus’ – and the instruments often sound fittingly grand because of this.

Another good move than Nash made on this album was making use of guest vocalists. While almost all of them are underused, Wild Beasts’ Tom Fleming especially, they often manage to provide a certain gravitas that the lead singer can’t muster. ‘The Sirens’ works mainly because of the guest vocals from The Staves – easily being one of the best tracks on the album. There are a lot of times on The Pace of Passing that Toothless try to go for a catchy almost poppy feel, and it only really works on this song.

‘The Sun’s Midlife Crisis’ is another song that I have to give props to. Though it has a few weak lyrics in it, the song has a genuinely interesting focus, being about exactly what its title suggests it is. Like a lot of the songs on the album it has a mythological vibe, almost feeling like a fable. Not every element of the song works, but it’s got a certain uniqueness to it that I felt was worth highlighting.

Overall though, the album’s glimmers of goodness don’t really save it from its weaker aspects. Sadly it’s not one of those mixed albums that’s made up of some great songs and some bad ones… More it’s one of those mixed albums that’s made of good elements and bad elements that feature in every track. While some songs are definitely better than others, my resounding verdict on The Pace of Passing is meh.

Essential Songs: ‘Charon’, ‘The Sun’s Midlife Crisis’, ‘The Sirens’.

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